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We are pleased to share the Ghent Neighborhood Spring 2010 Newsletter. Members should receive a copy in the mail while others can obtain a free copy from Ghent neighborhood shops.

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March 2009 Newsletter

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
– By Mike Spencer
As spring approaches, the Ghent Neighborhood League board is taking stock of its efforts and accomplishments during the past year. Through the efforts of many had-working individuals, we think it has been a successful one. Here are some highlights:
– The league has worked closely with the city to protect ordinances and regulations impacting our community. Most notable is the work accomplished to keep the height ordinance in place that will help preserve the historic nature of our neighborhood.
– The league has reviewed and commented on several planned projects for Ghent. It was very involved in commenting on the proposed Harris Teeter store rebuild. As a result, we were able to come to an agreement on the project’s development along Colonial Avenue and ensuring it will contribute to what is considered a main Ghent corridor.
– The league has been very active with the Norfolk Police Department and city engineers in looking at safety and security issues. We have been involved in city studies looking at parking and traffic flow. We were instrumental in getting the city to address some lighting issues along Core Avenue. The board continues to monitor law violations throughout Ghent with the police department. Information about specific crimes, in turn, are distributed to residents. Between the efforts of police and residents we have some of the lowest crime statistics in the past several years.
– The league continues to reach out to other community groups in an effort to communicate on items of common interest and to share community resources. The league maintains close ties with the Ghent Business Association; the two, with obvious areas of common interest interests, have demonstrated the ability to work together to solve common concerns. Earlier this year, the league reached out to the Park Place Civic League and began a conversation about common agenda items that we may support one another with.
I think you would agree with my assessment that this is a hard-working board. In return, its members ask for only one thing, your support, either through your membership or through volunteer hours. Over the next year, issues will become even more difficult with fewer resources available. It will be even more important that we work collectively and think strategically to solve these problems.
Think globally, act locally, join the Ghent Neighborhood League.

BOARD MEETINGS: KEY ISSUES
This column provides an overview of recent decisions by the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League and of comments made by those who attended the board’s meetings. For meeting details, please see the board minutes at http://www.GhentNeighborhoodLeague.org.
Board actions:
Between September 2008 and February 2009, the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League took the following actions:
– Agreed to look into creating a working group with Park Place on common issues. It also expressed interest in established a partnership with the Ghent Square homeowners’ association.
– Directed its president to ask the Norfolk Planning Commission to reconsider the design it approved for the Harris Teeter plan for its Ghent store plan to include pergolas and benches. Should the response be negative, the president is to approach the Norfolk Preservation Alliance and other organizations to speak against the Planning Commission’s plan, which called only for a low wall on Colonial Avenue, and express this in a letter. The motion was approved with one board member opposed.
– Directed its president to send a letter to the City of Norfolk on the league’s concerns about the development of the design of the proposed Spotswood parking lot, in particular with regard to screening, security, lighting, a C-2 conditional zoning or overlay and a big tree, and requesting that significant consideration be given to the concerns of the affected residents.
– Approved the changeover from board member Susanne Williams to attorney Joseph Lassiter as the league’s new Registered Agent.
– Approved, for presentation to the city’s new Historic Preservation and Architectural Committee, a list of concerns, which was presented to the committee on Jan. 21.
– Appointed Henry Conde and Joan McEnery as the league’s authorized representatives to make a presentation to Norfolk’s new Historic and Architectural Preservation Committee.
– Approved the expenditure for the league to design, produce and provide Ghent property owners with a magnet with Ghent Neighborhood league and locally relevant information.
– Approved expenditures to print and distribute, on a trial basis, a monthly bulletin to league members and Ghent businesses.
– Approved to pledge $ 1,000 to sponsor a brick column for the Ghent Dog Park.
– Approved to move the league’s January meeting to Jan. 12 and its February meeting to Feb. 9; it also approved reimbursement expenses for coffee and cookies at the December meeting.
Mike Spencer, the board’s president, will contact Norfolk Police Department officials to ensure that monthly police reports shared with the Ghent Neighborhood League also contain reports of incidents that are listed only in the department’s internal incident reports.
Residents’ concerns:
– Cars being parked on a private property in the 600 block of Boissevain Avenue and a sign that does not seem to meet the city’s sign ordinance
– Homeless
– Trash problems at an apartment complex on Colonial Avenue
– Missing finial removed from Blair Middle School during construction
– Incomplete police department reports
– Underground leaks near the 7/11 at the corner of Princess Anne Road and Colonial Avenue; also wet areas in the 500 and 600 blocks of Graydon Avenue
– Increased residential density in Ghent as a result of new and planned developments.COMMITTEE SEEKS NOMINATIONS
At the February 2009 Ghent Neighborhood League meeting, two-time league President Mike Spencer appointed Mason Andrews Jr., Allan Bull and Sharon Plawin to this year’s nominations committee; as outgoing president, he will serve on the board as well.
The committee is soliciting nominations from the league’s members for all officer board positions — president, vice president, secretary and treasurer — and four director positions.
According to the league’s by-laws, “Nominations will be accepted from any member in good standing if received by the Nominating Committee at the official GNL post office box not later than April 1 provided that nominations specify the office sought by the nominee The committee shall request nominations from the membership by notice in the January and February GNL newsletters and by concurrent notice on the GNL website. The committee shall report on its progress to the Board of Directors at the February meeting and, at the March meeting, shall present a slate of officers and directors to be listed on the election ballot along with other nominations.”

CITY COUNCIL AGREES TO MAINTAIN HISTORIC DISTRICTS’ MAXIMUM HEIGHT
– By Joan McEnery
On Oct. 7, 2008, the Norfolk City Council voted to maintain the 35-foot maximum height for structures in the Ghent and Freemason historic districts. This vote on a proposed zoning amendment was the culmination of a nearly six-month community effort to preserve the maximum height that safeguarded the neighborhoods for more than a generation. There was a groundswell of community opposition to the city’s attempts to abolish the existing height ceiling and instead replace it with a process that had no maximum height restriction in our residential district. The proposed amendment met with strong opposition as it could have permitted buildings which were not in keeping with the character of the neighborhood.
The Ghent Neighborhood League voiced strong neighborhood opposition to such drastic and inappropriate changes to the historic district zoning that would have weakened the protections and put the neighborhood at risk. The data used by the city to justify its position were admittedly incomplete, not accurate and susceptible to flaws. League representatives undertook the extraordinary effort of measuring nearly a third of all buildings in Ghent. The results confirmed that the 35-foot height limit is in keeping with the character of the neighborhood’s historic district and should be maintained.
League board members testified before city officials several times, pointing out that the proposed city versions would have left our historic districts with a height ordinance with far less protections than other residential neighborhoods in Norfolk.
Thanks to the efforts of Mayor Paul Fraim and council members Dr. Theresa Whibley and Barclay Winn, a revised amendment was adopted by council that maintains the 35-foot height limit. In addition, it required that waivers be granted only through “special exceptions” which require city council approval.

FUNERAL HOME SALE PIQUES INTEREST
– By Susanne Williams

The owners of the Cox Funeral Home at 631 Westover St., which has served as a funeral home since 1923, have received several offers for the $1.5 million, three-parcel property but have not yet made a final decision on the future of this Ghent landmark.
Frank N. Graves said he and his brother, Bryan B. Graves, have received numerous inquiries from interested parties since the property went on the market in mid-October last year. Inquiries were made by churches, synagogues, schools, potential bed-and-breakfast operators and individuals who would like to retain it as a private residence.
Some of the other suggested uses included proposals for a restaurant and a music club, said Eric Levin of Global Real Estate Investments, the company which is marketing the property. Levin and his broker, Mike Zarpas, have received inquiries almost daily, some of them from parties outside of Norfolk.
The property consists of the 4-story, 6,500-square-foot corner building with a basement, an adjacent 5,000-square-foot chapel and a third of the parking lot across the street. Levin said that he wasn’t sure about the exact number of parking spaces; “I want to be fluid,” depending on the property’s eventual use.
The funeral home lies in the HC-G2 historic district which is considered residential but permits other uses as well that were grandfathered when the zoning was put in place in the 1970s. HC. Any new use would be subject a use change permit, Graves said.
According to the City of Norfolk’s zoning ordinance which covers the HC-G2 district, permitted uses include religious institutions, parks, playgrounds and, by special exception, bed and breakfast establishments. All uses are subject to specific requirements.
The funeral home started life as a residence, built by a horse trader as a wedding present for his then 15-year-old bride, Graves said. When his wife eventually sold the property, the house was turned into a hospital and, in 1923, into a funeral home. The Cox family bought it in 1955 but retained the Cox name to avoid confusion with an already existing Graves funeral home on Church Street.
When Graves and his brother merged their business with Oliver Funeral Homes in October, they added, as part of the merger, a restrictive covenant under which the property cannot be used as a funeral home for the next 25 years. The corner-lot building features detailed woodwork and the oldest manually operated elevator in Norfolk, installed in 1924.

City committee hears Ghent concerns
On Jan. 21, league representatives presented the following to the city’s new Historic and Architectural Preservation Committee:
– Administration and enforcement of existing laws and guidelines
– Impact on community of non-residential uses
– District-wide residential zoning vs. a historic district overlay zone
– Height ordinance
– Demolition of historic structures
– Amendments to the city’s historic district ordinance
– Communication and community input
– Support for the role of the committee

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September 2007 Newsletter

President’s Comments
-By Mike Spencer
Labor Day. The end of summer. Beginning of another school year. Another opportunity to become active with the Ghent Neighborhood League. Okay, I admit they don’t all necessarily follow one another. But you do have another opportunity to be active with the GNL. As we enter into the fall season we once again have a host of issues facing out community. Numerous projects challenge the historic designation of our neighborhood. Developers continue to look for variances in zoning ordinances and historic standards throughout the Ghent community. Neighborhood security is another topic. We continue to face challenges to property and individuals. The board of the GNL has adopted three goals to focus on these issues. These include:
– Create community interest to protect the historic infrastructure of our neighborhood.
– Unite the community around a safe and secure neighborhood.
– Improve the quality of life throughout Ghent by creating a sense of community.
Our strategies related to these goals involve reviewing plans for projects that impact our neighborhood, developing a block security plan and implementing social opportunities for neighbors to meet and enjoy fellowship with one another.
If any or all of these interest you, I would like to extend an invitation to you to become an active member of the Ghent Neighborhood League. We meet once a month to discuss these and other pertinent topics. Your involvement will make a profound difference in our community.
You can learn more by visiting the GNL web site or by coming to our monthly meeting the third Monday of each month. We meet at Blair Middle School at 7 p.m.

SOON TO COME BEFORE THE NORFOLK CITY COUNCIL

The following Ghent issues may be heard by the Norfolk City Council as early as Sept. 11. This meeting will be held at 2:30 p.m., 11th floor, City Hall. Please check http://www.norfolk.gov for council agenda updates.
TALMUDICAL ACADEMY

The Talmudical Academy of Norfolk, currently operating out of spaces leased from the B’Nai Israel temple in the 400 block of Shirley Avenue, wants to move to a commercial property at 612 Colonial Ave., home for several years of CCG Systems.
The academy, one of the newest Orthodox secondary schools in the country, according to a January 2006 article in The Virginian-Pilot, is to be a day school for up to 60 male students, with projected school hours to be between 7:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., and some extracurricular affairs until 10 p.m.
The Colonial Avenue building — zoned residential but used for commercial purposes — lies in one of Ghent’s three historic zones which does not permit educational facilities. As a result, the academy initially sought from the City of Norfolk a zoning text amendment, which would have allowed schools to operate anywhere in the area between Olney Road and Princess Anne; it also sought a special exception permit.
Following presentations to the Ghent Neighborhood League in July and August, the applicant, represented by Kaufman & Canoles attorney Charles McPhillips, withdrew the zoning application and simple sought a special exception permit under Chapter 12-6 of the Norfolk Zoning Ordinance. The section allows changes from one non-conforming use to another by special exception. Chapter 25-7 of the ordinance lists 11 conditions city council is to consider before granting special exception permits.
League members expressed numerous concerns about the plan, including the now withdrawn zoning change, parking, loss of tax revenue, food facilities and parking. McPhillips said that while the site only has 12 marked off-street and three or four on-street parking spaces, there probably will not be much demand for student parking, since most of the students live in the neighborhood; most of the parking thus will be for staff.
On Aug. 20, the league’s board voted against the plan and conveyed the vote to the Norfolk Planning Commission. On Aug. 23, the commission voted 7:0 in favor. A few weeks earlier, the Colonial Avenue building had been sold by JHN Enterprises LLC to Colonial Avenue Associates for $950,000.
CHRIST AND ST. LUKE’S
City Council will make a final decision on an expansion plan by Christ and St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, which includes the demolition of several buildings, including the historic Guild House, and the erection of a modernistic structure along Stockley Gardens.
The complex plan, which requires numerous permits from various city agencies, ultimately did not receive “final approval” from the Norfolk Design Review Committee and the Norfolk Planning Commission; it also did not receive permission from the Norfolk Board of Zoning Appeals to consider two church-owned lots as being “adjacent” for building purposes, a decision that the church fought unsuccessfully before the Virginia Supreme Court.
The church now is appealing the planning commission’s tie vote to city council. The city’s decision will be binding unless challenged in court.
The Ghent Neighborhood League has opposed the plan from its very start as being inappropriate for the historic area in which the church is located; its opposition pertains to the demolition of a historic structure, the lack of parking and the architectural incompatibility of the proposed new building with other properties in the historic zone.
COLLEY PARKING GARAGE
EVMS/Sentara is seeking an interim amendment to its Medical Center Master Plan to build an eight-story, 850-space garage at the corner of Redgate, Raleigh and Colley avenues. The structure is to be an addition to an already existing four-story 1,900-space garage on the medical center’s campus.
According to architect Barry Moss, a partner with Tymoff+Architects who presented the plan to the Ghent Neighborhood League at its July and August meetings, the proposed brick addition, flanked by two towers, would be about 70 to 75 feet in height, possibly the height of the Jones Institute on Brambleton Avenue. The garage is to allow for a reassignment of staff parking spaces from other, more southern medical center parking locations. Exit/entrance lanes would remain on Raleigh through the existing garage.
EVMS/Sentara officials said that in spite of Norfolk’s plan for Light Rail, with a planned terminal at the medical center, the 850 garage spaces still are a minimum number to accommodate the center’s expected 10 to 15 percent growth over the next five to 10 years. The medical complex does not offer employees incentives to use alternate modes of transportation.
Concerned league members questioned the proposed structure and its location; a better space for it would be the green space in front of Norfolk General Hospital, one member said. — The league’s board did not take a formal vote on the plan.
– By Susanne Williams

BOARD MEETINGS: KEY ISSUES
This column provides an overview of recent decisions by the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League and of comments made by those who attended the board’s meetings. For meeting details, please see the minutes at http://www.Ghentneighborhoodleague.org.
Board actions:
Between April 2007 and August 2007, the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League took the following actions:
– Approved $200 for refreshments for a neighborhood gathering in Beechwood Park.
– Authorized [now Immediate Past] President Mason Andrews Jr. to ask city officials for an update on the511 Graydon property.
– Asked President Mike Spencer to inform City Council, again, of the board’s continued opposition to the expansion plan of Christ and St. Luke’s.
– Voted against a planned conversion of the 612 Colonial Ave. property for use of the Talmudical Academyand authorized President Mike Spencer to convey this vote to the Norfolk Planning Commission. – Thanked Mason Andrews Jr. for her service as the league’s two-time president.
Residents’ concerns:
Over the past months, residents expressed the following concerns to the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League: Crime, concerns over the proposed school move and an eight-story garage on Colley Avenue, homeless problems and non-functioning street lights.

REAL ESTATE SALES
March 2007 through August 2007

The Ghent Neighborhood League thanks Web Chandler of Nancy Chandler Associates Inc. for providing this information on recent Ghent property sales, which were listed and sold by various REIN members.
DETACHED List price Sale price
830 Shirley $332,000 $332,000
830 Maury $349,000 $349,000
724 W. Princess A. $429,000 $393,000
705 Westover $450,000 $300,000
614 Baldwin $470,000 $430,000
523 Westover $475,000 $475,000
608 Westover $494,000 $465,000
623 Graydon $498,500 $498,500
712 Baldwin $499,000 $425,000
632 Graydon $499,900 $445,000
500 Colonial $635,000 $590,000
504 Mowbray $750,000 $727,500
502 Fairfax $760,000 $750,000
418 Mowbray $1,250,000 $1,250,000
ATTACHED List price Sale price
524 Graydon, 8 $ 99,500 $ 99,500
1413 Colonial, C-8 $119,500 $119,500
1413 Colonial, C-5 $119,500 $119,500
617 Boissevain, 2 $120,000 $115,000
1115 Colley, B-1 $160,000 $150,000
623 Raleigh $174,900 $157,000
816 Gates, A-2 $185,000 $185,000
1400 Hampton, C-3 $194,000 $194,000
1205 Westover, A-6 $199,000 $190,000
828 Harrington, 4 $199,000 $180,000
538 Wash. Park, B-6 $199,000 $199,000
1115 Colley, A-2 $199,900 $199,900
800 W. Princess A.., C-3 $199,900 $195,000
1017 Colonial, 4 $200,000 $203,000
1323 Colonial, 1 $209,000 $201,500
742 Wash. Park, A-1 $215,000 $215,000
742 Wash. Park, C-5 $219,000 $219,000
1111 Colley, 6 $219,000 $225,000
610 W. Princess A., B-3 $219,000 $216,000
610 W. Princess A., A-4 $220,000 $220,000
1304 Stockley G., 503 $225,000 $225,000
1210 Stockley G. , 601 $229,900 $219,500
600 W. Olney, 302 $235,000 $230,000
849 Baldwin, 2D $235,900 $215,000
1506 Colonial, 6 $239,900 $239,900
517 20th , 502 $239,900 $239,900
1206 Stockley G., 404 $249,500 $243,000
527 W. 20th, 401 $252,000 $250,000
1009 Colonial, 6 $319,000 $319,900
918 Colonial, B $319,900 $315,000
1311 Colonial, 5 $329,000 $319,000
736 W. Princess A., 402 $329,000 $325,000
810 W. Princess A., 11 $340,000 $330,000
810 W. Princess A., 203 $344,900 $347,000
520 W. Olney, 1 $347,500 $347,500
700 H Raleigh $349,900 $355,000
810 W. Princess A., 201 $360,000 $357,000
807 Colonial $395,000 $395,000
619 Redgate $419,000 $400,000
632 Redgate $465,000 $431,100
517 Westover $479,000 $470,000
N/A List price Sale price
726 W. Princess A. $338,000 $338,000
732 Yarmouth $415,000 $405,000
731 Shirley $568,000 $554,000
630 Raleigh $152,900 $144,750

Homeless in Ghent: Church asks for assistance from City of Norfolk
-By Susanne Williams
Following discussions between Sacred Heart Church and members of the league’s Homeless Committee, the church in May announced that it will no longer allow sleepovers on the parking lot of its Graydon Avenue property. Sacred Heart, a participant in the Norfolk Emergency Shelter Team (NEST) program also sought the city’s help.
“The number of people sleeping at our church has increased and so have the problems,” Father Daniel N. Klem wrote in a letter to neighbors and others, including Mayor Paul D. Fraim.
“There have been noise, alcohol and sanitation problems. Our neighbors have taken the brunt of noise problems that occur late in the evening or early morning. The sanitation problems (urination and defecation on our property) are a really health hazard to those who must clean it up. Alcohol has been brought onto the property and consumed by some of our guests with too much frequency.”
Klem also appealed to the city. “We as a parish are not equipped nor is it our mission to become a service provider. It is imperative that the homeless committee of Sacred Heart continue to meet and be a leaven in the city of Norfolk to truly address the cause of homelessness and the available resources and alternatives available.”
Church members will prepare specific proposals for the city in the next months.
The church, the league’s committee, service providers and city representatives had met in March to discuss the homeless problem in Ghent.
One of the suggestions — a central location for providing food and shelter — did not resonate with Catherine Kitchin, director of Norfolk’s Office to End Homelessness. In a note to a committee member after the March meeting, she also said that earlier discussions with the Salvation Army and the Union Mission showed that these year-round service providers do not support the idea of a centralized intake and that programs for homeless families for which the city seeks grants are not meant for soup kitchens and shelters.
“I personally would not advocate that the City use limited grant or city funds for these purposes, Kitchin wrote. “We are focusing our efforts on long-term solutions.”
The March meeting was attended by city council members Barclay C. Winn and Dr. Theresa W. Whibley, both of whom represent Ghent. “I hope by bringing the NEST program and those in the Ghent Neighborhood League together… they can come up with some solutions… that the city could work toward,” she wrote to a Ghent resident after the meeting.

BUSINESS BEAT
Ghent: Written up but invisible

While Ghent netted some laudatory ink in Southern Living’s May issue, you’d be hard-pressed to find the story when perusing the magazine’s Web site. Its Editors’ City Guide makes no individual mention of Norfolk, leave alone Ghent; it only lists Norfolk under Virginia Beach. Searches for “Ghent” or Ghent Norfolk” produce a similar result: nothing. — Still, it was nice to see a friendly write-up even though the word ‘trendy’ for Ghent’s businesses is getting a little tiresome.
Sentara Norfolk: Written up but invisible
You’ll be equally hard-pressed to find a write-up for Sentara Norfolk on the Web site of U.S. News & World Report, which , in its July issue, had included the Sentara Heart Hospital among the top 50 ranking cardiac programs in the U.S.; the hospital’s kidney services also were ranked in the top 50. (In 2006, the hospital took the magazine’s 33 spot for its heart services and the No. 50 spot for kidney diseases).
Money for music
The Beazley Foundation of Portsmouth awarded $5,784 to The Academy of Music, formerly at 902 Colonial Ave. The academy’s offices meanwhile moved 10 1709 Colley Ave., Suite 302.
Redevelopment on West 21st Street
The City of Norfolk received three proposals by Stanton Partners/Robinson development, Cooper Realty and Bristol Development for the redevelopment of the old Senior Center site on West 21st Street. The buildings on the three-acre site are city-owned. The 21 Twenty One mixed used development on West 21st Street, site of the old Farm Fresh building that was scheduled to start construction in the summer of 2006 now is expected to have a spring 2008 opening.
Changes:
A new gift shop recently opened in Ghent’s Palace Shops with an array of nautical and retro gift items.Mystic Mermaid at 308 W. 21st Street also sells jewelry, garden accessories, handbags, paintings and more.
From Riverview to Ghent: More gifts — and gourmet baskets — now are available from Happy Go Lucky, a new business in the 21 West shopping center. The store is an offshoot of Bloom: The Art of Flowersin Norfolk’s Riverview neighborhood.
From Ghent to Riverview:Crackers, a long-time eating and drinking Ghent favorite on West 21st Street, is moving its restaurant to Granby Street, site of the former Parallel 36 restaurant, which is — or was — next door to Bloom: The Art of Flowers.
Palace Station, the newest commercial development in Ghent at 330 W. 22nd Street, has three new tenants: The NYFO clothing boutique, which moved to this location from its former 21st Street Pavilion address, now is at Suite 113; Wet Noses, a pet shop, opened at Suite 104. JW Tumbles, the first Norfolk location of children gym franchisor JW Tumbles, held two grand openings in early September at its location on the Palace Station’s north side.
The Ibiza restaurant is getting closer to opening at 328 W. 20th St., site of the now-closed D.C. Chase’s restaurant. In July, the Norfolk City Council granted a special exception for an entertainment establishment for the site; in early August, Ibiza LLC members/shareholders Christopher J. Harasty and William C. Wise applied to the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission for license to sell and manufacture alcohol beverages at the site.
Form & Function, a home décor and furniture store at 738 22nd St., has closed its doors.
Andrea G. DiCarlo is preparing a space at 738 W. 22nd St. for La Bella. DiCarlo, a Ghent resident, will be chef/owner of the 60-seat Italian restaurant for which the Norfolk City Council already granted a permit.
The former Spaghetti Warehouse on Monticello Ave. (also known as the former Plaza Azteca and the former El Sombrero) is being reincarnated as Gold’s Gym, expected to open soon. The gym is the first of owners Kirk and John Galiani’s chain of Gold Gyms in Norfolk; other locations are in Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia and North Carolina. Also part of the Galiani real estate portfolio is the old Farm Fresh property on 21 Street, slated to become a major residential development.
Rita’s Water Ice is preparing the space at 727 W. 21st St. for an amusement/recreational business.
Imperio Inca is readying for an opening at the old location of Cora’s at 723 W. 21st St.. Restaurant partners are Isaac and Carlos Espinoza.
In late July, G.W. Marketplace at 730 W. 21st. St. received permission from the Norfolk City Council to construct a one-story, 6,904-square-foot addition on the south side of the 31,820-square foot grocery store. The Chartway credit union, currently occupying the spot, is to move into the interior of the grocery store. Architects for the project are Burkhart, Thomas and Reed.
Bonnie Arnold’s framing shop and arts and antiques gallery has moved from Colonial Avenue, next to Cogan’s, to a new location at 517 W. 21st. St. The site recently was vacated by the former Broad Street bookshop, which went out of business.

Dog park update
The Ghent Dog Park Association, now incorporated as a 501(c)3 organization, received approval from city agencies to begin fund-raising for a $50,000 black powder-coated fence with double gates and brick columns around the city-designated off-leash dog park in the 1300 block of Stockley Gardens. The city also agreed to manage installation of the fence and maintain the park; additional improvements include landscaping, sidewalks on adjacent street sides, lighting and replacement of a deteriorated park walkway. Funds for the project will be raised through tax-deductible sponsorships, memberships and events. For details, see http://www.ghentdogpark.com; PAYPAL donations can be made via the Internet. The association was formed three years ago as a neighborhood grassroots effort to enhance the beauty and safety of the park, to strengthen relationships between dog and owner, to promote responsible dog ownership and to provide community and educational resources for dog-related concerns.
Ghent residents in the news
– In the April/May 2007 newsletter of the Bon Secours Maryview Medical Center, Bruce S. Britton, MD,was named chairman/president of the Medical Staff Leadership Team.
– Mason Andrews Jr., AIA, immediate past president of the Ghent Neighborhood League and member of the Norfolk Design Review Committee, was elected as one of the 2007 trustees of The United Way of South Hampton Roads Foundation.
– Attorneys Thomas G. Johnson, chairman, Willcox & Savage, and Ronald M. Gates, vice president, Wolcott Rivers Gates, were named 2007 Virginia Super lawyers in the 2007 edition of Virginia Super Lawyer.
Van Wyck library slated for repairs
The Van Wyck branch of the Norfolk Public Library system recently received a new roof while its parking spaces were re-asphalted and re-striped. Additional work in the interior of the building — painting, new carpeting and the installation of new computers — will necessitate a temporary closing of the branch between Oct. 3 and Nov. 17.
On May 21, city officials honored H.D. Van Wyck with the unveiling of its namesake’s portrait. In 1901, Van Wyck had bequeathed $15,000 which, combined with a later $20,000 grant by Andrew Carnie, allowed the construction of the Van Wyck branch. The library branch, Norfolk’s first, opened in 1916. 511 Graydon: No work, no response
Earlier this year, league members asked city officials for an update on the status of restoration work at 511 Graydon Ave. In May, then GNL President Mason Andrews Jr. followed up with a letter, again requesting information. A third inquiry was sent in August. To date, the city has not replied. The property had been slated for demolition several years ago; while the developer has been seeking various city permits, work on the property has been slow and currently is at a standstill. Windows above the second floor are not secured and open to the elements.
Harris Teeter not to expand in Ghent
As announced during the May meeting of the Ghent Neighborhood League, the Harris Teeter grocery chain will not be moving forward with its earlier expansion plan; thus the historic home on Colonial Avenue that is bordering the store on Colonial Avenue is not expected to be impacted.

BOARD MEETINGS: KEY ISSUES
This column provides an overview of recent decisions by the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League and of comments made by those who attended the board’s meetings. For meeting details, please see the minutes at http://www.Ghentneighborhoodleague.org.
Board actions:
Between April 2007 and August 2007, the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League took the following actions:
– Approved $200 for refreshments for a neighborhood gathering in Beechwood Park.
– Authorized [now Immediate Past] President Mason Andrews Jr. to ask city officials for an update on the511 Graydon property.
– Asked President Mike Spencer to inform City Council, again, of the board’s continued opposition to the expansion plan of Christ and St. Luke’s.
– Voted against a planned conversion of the 612 Colonial Ave. property for use of the Talmudical Academyand authorized President Mike Spencer to convey this vote to the Norfolk Planning Commission.
– Thanked Mason Andrews Jr. for her service as the league’s two-time president.
Residents’ concerns:
Over the past months, residents expressed the following concerns to the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League: Crime, concerns over the proposed school move and an eight-story garage on Colley Avenue, homeless problems and non-functioning street lights.

COMMITTEE REPORTS
By-laws Committee (ad hoc)

Dr. Kevin Halista was appointed committee chair in spring. Previous chair was Sharon Plawin.
Communications Committee
The summer issue of the Ghent Newsletter is turning into a September 2007 issue because many board members were absent over the past months. The following newsletter will be published in early 2008. Susanne Williams, committee chair, welcomes newsletter submissions, letters to the editor and newsletter art. — Www.Ghentneighborhoodleague.org, the league’s Web site, has been updated; for discussions on Ghent issues, submit your entries under “What are your thoughts?” on the site’s drop-down menu.
Community Improvement Committee
The committee, co-chaired by Blount Hunter and Dennis Russell, has not met over the summer months but will start again in September. Russell already contacted city officials on zoning questions.
GBA Liaison
Helen Brown and Mason Andrews serve as liaison members to the Ghent Business Association. Their monthly reports are included in the league’s minutes at http://www.Ghentneighborhoodleague.org.
Ghent Task Force
Mike Spencer is the league’s liaison to the mayoral Ghent Task Force. His reports are included in the minutes at http://www.Ghentneighborhoodleague.org.
Historic Committee:
No report.
Membership Committee
No report. Committee members are Dr. Kevin Halista and Allan Bull.
Programs Committee
No report. The committee is chaired by Jon Hanbury.
Publicity Committee
Committee member Sharon Plawin informed The Compass of the league’s new meeting venue in the new wing of Blair Middle School where meetings have been held since July. Also serving on the committee are Mike Spencer and BarBara Murphy.
Sector Representatives Committee
Following an early June armed robbery in the 800 block of Harrington, the committee has been working on improving lighting in that area. Ghent’s Community Services Officer William B. Routon, Norfolk Police Department, was asked to provide crime reports from the last several years to identify crime patterns as a way to expedite a lighting request with the City of Norfolk and Dominion Power, usually a nine- to 12-month implementation project. The committee, chaired by Paige Rose, also requested from the city a petition form for increasing lights and changing light bulbs on Harrington that needs to be signed by 51 percent of the Harrington residents. In June, Officer Routon said that an extra patrol car would be in the Colley/Hampton Boulevard area. In April, Rose informed the league’s board of the committee’s proposed boundaries for Ghent’s sector representatives. Sector representatives are Ghent residents volunteering to be the league’s “eyes and ears” on security matters and to act as liaison on matters of concern between residents in Ghent’s 11 sectors and the league’s board.
Volunteers are needed for all committees. Please contact us at gnl@Ghentneighborhoodleague.org.


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Since the July 2006 newsletter recently went out, here are a few thoughts and an immediate correction.
1.AVAILABILITY
For an electronic copy, please click on the “Newsletter Online!” button, right below News Flashes. Hard copies are available at their usual Ghent distribution sites (businesses of our advertisers, real estate offices, restaurants and the Van Wyck library). If you would like to receive the newsletter by mail, please contact us at gnl@GhentNeighborhoodLeague.org. The newsletter is mailed free of charge to all Ghent Neighborhood League members; non-members can receive the newsletter for an annual $10 fee.
2. CORRECTIONS
Based on incorrect information, the July 2006 Ghent Newsletter erroneously stated that the two Colonial Avenue properties on Colonial Avenue, owned by First Presbyterian Church, currently are on the city’s tax rolls. As representatives of the church told the Ghent Neighborhood League at its July 17 meeting, the church does not charge rents to its tenants at the two Colonial sites, i.e. the Norfolk Music Academy and the Tidewater Pastoral Counseling Services.
We much apologize for the error.
Generally speaking: We much invite all of our readers to let us know right away of any corrections that need to be made so that we can post them on our Web site immediately.
3. NEWSLETTER CONTRIBUTIONS
If you would like to contribute a story to the Ghent Newsletter, please contact us at our e-mail address.
4. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The Ghent Newsletter welcomes Letters to the Editor. Again, please contact us at our e-mail address.

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July 2006 Newsletter

PRESIDENT’S COMMENTS
– By Mason Andrews Jr.

This issue of the newsletter reports on the many new projects in and around Ghent that are currently under construction or in planning. The sheer scope of construction is breathtaking and will raise in many minds the question of what armatures regulate the density of development in our neighborhood.
The primary code regulating building within Ghent is Norfolk’s Zoning Ordinance, developed in the 1970s to encourage the preservation of the districts’ extant residential patterns. South of Olney Road, the HC-G1 district is zoned for single-family residential with historic district regulations developed to ensure that new or infill development is compatible in scope, scale and architecture with the area’s original design.
The HC-G2 district between Olney and Princess Anne is zoned for a mix of single– and multi-family dwellings. Greater density and lot coverage are allowed than in the HC-G1 district, reflecting the scale of this historic area’s apartment blocks.
Lots north of Princess Anne are assigned a variety of residential, commercial and institutional designations, depending on their use at the time of the zoning ordinance.
The ordinance, written by Zoning Administrator Leonard Newcomb with significant input from the community, has served Ghent well over the years and has been modified rarely since its adoption.
Yet recently, several amendments have been made. One, passed over the objections of the Ghent Neighborhood League’s board, allows increased density on lots containing non-conforming (commercial) uses. The precipitating project was the planned Ellington condominium project on Redgate Avenue. The board’s concerns lay less with the project itself than in the wisdom of altering the ordinance to provide incentives for increasing density and traffic within this historic district not just at that site but on others as well. The Norfolk Planning Commission and City Council were not persuaded by the board’s concerns and the amendment has gone into effect.
A citywide amendment that increases the amount by which a non-conforming structure can be expanded passed earlier this year.
Now proposed is a new amendment to Ghent’s historic districts that would provide for an increase in lot coverage for commercial and institutional uses. This alteration raises a number of concerns, which have been communicated to the city in a letter soon available on the league’s Web site; Mr. Newcomb will discuss the proposed amendment at our July 17 meeting.
Scrutiny of the alteration of the regulations governing growth in the neighborhood is, it seems to me, a primary function of a civic league. We hope you will let us hear your thoughts on the subject and join us for the July 17 meeting.

News Flashes

Changes ahead for Ghent
The Wales, house, above, and the Guild House at the corner of Stockley Gardens and Boissevain are two of Ghent’s historic buildings that could fall prey to new development. Demolition of venerable structures is just one of the many consequences of changes considered for Ghent. Also altering our community are a number of zoning amendments and the potentially rapid increase of new housing development in and around our neighborhood. For an overview, please see “The Changing face of our community.”
Disclosure mandated for historic homes
Under a new law passed by the 2006 Virginia General Assembly, sellers of property in historic districts designated by a locality now have to disclose such designation, if they are aware of it. Otherwise, residential property disclosure statements must advise buyers to exercise due diligence to determine whether provisions of a historic district ordinance may affect the property.
In Ghent, the law — based on a bill by Del. Lionell Spruill Sr. — pertains to properties between Yarmouth Street and Princess Anne Road (for exact boundaries please see:http://www.norfolk.gov/planning/comehome/maps/ghent_historic.pdf).
As a reminder: Exterior changes to properties in Ghent’s historic areas also require approval by the Norfolk Design Review Committee and the Norfolk Planning Commission.

OK pending for Westover decal parking

Following a petition by residents in the 800 block of Westover for decal parking, a meeting was held June 14 to familiarize the public with details of a proposed expansion of the Zone 6 residential parking permit program for the 800 Westover block, said John Stevenson of Norfolk’s Division of Transportation. A public hearing on the petition was held afterwards.
The meeting was followed by a 15-day comment period after which the petition, along with comments and the division’s recommendation, was sent to City Manager Regina Williams for her approval, a process that may take up to 60 days.
A survey of the Westover block, conducted by the city in January this year, found that 83 percent of the block’s legal parking spaces were used, with 89 percent of these spaces used by non-residents, Stevenson said. The numbers are more than sufficient to warrant decal parking and exceed the city’s minimum criteria for decal parking, namely that at least 70 percent of legal parking spaces are occupied and that 20 percent of these are occupied by non-residents.

Williams School principal to bid adieu
Bart Baldwin, headmaster of the Williams School at 419 Colonial Ave. for the past 11 years, will be leaving the 177-student school at the end of the 2006-2007 school year.

New committee chairs appointed
Please consider joining one of the committees by contacting the chairs by phone or by sending a brief message to gnl@GhentNeighborhoodLeague.org.
Sector Representative Committee:
Paige Rose
Membership Committee:
Kevin Halista
Community Improvement:
Jon Hanbury/Paige Rose
Publicity/Social Events:
Brook Smith
Program Committee:
Mike Spencer
Communications Committee:
Susanne Williams
Homeless Committee (ad hoc):
Mike Spencer
Historic Committee (ad hoc):
Jon Hanbury/Paige Rose
Ghent Greeter Program (ad hoc):
Joan McEnery
Elections Guideline Committee (ad hoc):
Mike Spencer

BOARD MEETINGS: KEY ISSUES

This column provides an overview of recent decisions by the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League and of comments made by those who attended the board’s meetings. For meeting details, please see the minutes at http://www.GhentNeighborhodLeague.org.

Board decisions:
Between March and June 2006, the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League took the following actions:
– To form an ad-hoc homeless committee to address Ghent’s homeless problems
– To form a historic committee to help place the area between Princess Anne Road and 20th Street on the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Registry
– To send a thank-you letter to the City of Norfolk for implementing decal parking in the 700 block of Graydon Avenue
– To send a letter to city officials voicing the league’s concerns about a proposed historic zoning district amendment on increased lot coverage for institutional and commercial structures.
Residents’ concerns:
Over the past four months, residents expressed the following concerns to the board of the Ghent Neighborhood League:
– Speeding on Colley and Colonial avenues
– Skateboarding on private property on Graydon Avenue
– Graffiti on signs and buildings in Ghent
– An apparent increase in the number of homeless in Ghent.

Election results announced
At the June meeting of the Ghent Neighborhood League, board member Mike Spencer announced three new members to the league’s board: Jon Hanbury, Dr. Kevin Halista and Paige Rose, previously Paige Goodwin. Former board member Joe Maus became the league’s new treasurer; incumbent board member Brook Smith was reelected as were most officers who ran unopposed this year. For the new composition of the board please see the boxed information on the right side of this page.
Departing the board are Carl Sykes, the league’s treasurer for the past two years, and board members Helen Brown and Stanley Rose; Helen Brown, however, will stay active in the league as the board’s liaison to the Ghent Business Association.
The league is most grateful to all board members, past and present, for their time and efforts on behalf of the Ghent community: A commitment to serve is the lifeblood of any organization, including your civic league. Please join the league to help make Ghent a better place to live.

THE CHANGING FACE OF OUR COMMUNITY
-By Susanne Williams

Zoning law amendments, expansion plans by businesses and houses of faith and the “condo-nization” could radically alter the nature of Ghent.
The changes will affect even our community’s historic districts, the area between the Hague and Princess Anne Road that we believed was protected by city law. Incompatibly scaled architecture, more institutional services, more traffic and more parking problems in a densely-populated neighborhood that already suffers from severe parking, traffic and speeding problems could be the consequence.
These problems may well be exacerbated for all areas of Ghent by the addition of hundreds of condominiums or apartments, some of which will come on line soon or are on the drawing board.
Zoning changes
– The Planning Commission has applied for and soon will hear a proposed amendment to the historic district zoning for Ghent that would allow institutional and commercial uses to increase their lot coverage from 50 to 70 percent. In Ghent, the most immediate beneficiary will be Christ and St. Luke’s whose expansion plan exceeds the city’s current 50 percent cap (see next page). — This amendment will be the subject of a presentation at the Ghent Neighborhood League’s July 17 meeting. In May, the Norfolk City Council adopted a city-wide zoning amendment that allows non-conforming structures to expand by 50 percent instead of only 10 percent. In Ghent, the immediate beneficiary is Christ and St. Luke’s, whose expansion plans exceed the former 10 percent cap (see next page).
– In May, Norfolk City Council also changed the process for modifications to front and side yards in historic districts. Under this change, the review– and decision-making process shifted from the Norfolk Planning Commission (review) and City Council (final decision) to the Norfolk Design Review Committee (review) and Norfolk Planning Commission. — This zoning change has ramifications on the city’s appeal process: Previous council decisions could be appealed by all parties to the state courts; Planning Commission decisions, by contrast, can be appealed only by applicants, not opposing parties such as civic leagues. — The appeal issue currently is a matter before the Virginia Supreme Court.
– Last August, City Council approved an amendment to the historic zoning for Ghent under which non-historic commercial structures can be replaced with higher-density residential development. The immediate beneficiary was The Ellington condominium project at 840 Redgate Ave.
Expansion plans
– Harris Teeter on Colonial Avenue is considering plans to build a larger store on the north side of its current location between Colonial, DeBree and Shirley avenues. The plan as originally shared with the Ghent Neighborhood League could mean the destruction of the William Wales House at 1400 Colonial Ave., a 1911 building, and its replacement with a parking lot.
– First Presbyterian Church, with a reported membership of now 1,800, wants to accommodate its growing congregation by enlarging its premises, by creating a large fellowship hall and by changing the use of two church-owned buildings on Colonial Avenue — currently on the city’s tax roll — for church-related purposes.
– Christ and St. Luke’s wants to accommodate its growing congregation by building a new, modernistic building alongside the church. The plans involve the destruction of several buildings, including the historic Guild Hall, for which it already has received permission; three lawsuits, however, are challenging the city’s decisions. The plans also exceed Norfolk’s requirements for the expansion of non-conforming structures and lot coverage; please see Page 3 (Zoning amendments) for an update.
New Housing units
New on the market, proposed or on the drawing board are the following new condominium and apartment developments in or close to Ghent. The numbers vary a little, depending on the source:
In Ghent:
– Colonial Avenue townhouses: 4 units, completed
– The Row at Ghent (Granby Street): 70, 84 or 90 condominiums, under construction
– The Bristol at Ghent (Granby Street): 264 or 268 apartments, under construction
– The Colonnades at Ghent, Princess Anne/Colonial: 24 condominiums, under construction
– The Ellington (corner Redgate and Hampton): 15 condominiums, under construction
– McRae Commons: 9 condominiums, under construction
– 21 Twenty One: 244, 246 or 268 apartments, ground to be broken this fall
Close to Ghent:
– The Franklin, Duke/Brambleton: 20 condominiums
– Harbor’s Edge (at the bottom of Colley Avenue): 163 or 164 units
– Corner Duke/Brambleton: 248 units
Sources:
– 2006 Norfolk Residential Real Estate, published by Inside Business in conjunction with the Norfolk Department of Development
– The Virginian-Pilot, Real estate advertising supplement, April 2006
– Destination Ghent advertising supplement, March 10, 2006
– Norfolk Department of Development, special supplement to the 2006 Mayor’s State of the City Address

WHO CARES ABOUT GHENT?
– By Blount Hunter
Second Vice President, GNL

Our neighborhood is undergoing a variety of changes in its housing stock, its institutions and its commercial base. Some celebrate “progress” while others despair.
The title of this article was selected as a means of initiating a healthy discussion about the changes planned or underway in Ghent. We are the current generation of residents in a neighborhood that is more than 100 years old. Are we good stewards of a place that attracted us for its unique and irreplaceable attributes? Have you taken a close look at the issues behind some of the changes in Ghent’s landscape?
– Is the unique historic character of the neighborhood threatened by new development?
– Will greater residential density and additional commercial activity impact the “quality of life” in Ghent for better or worse?
– Are we in favor of allowing institutions to become larger without providing parking for congregants or evening activity patrons?
– Is there a natural conflict between commercial interests and residential interests?
– Are our historic properties granted enough protection from destruction or alteration?
– Should the boundaries of the local, state and federal historic districts be expanded as a means of insuring the long-term sustainability of our neighborhood?
– Have residents considered the implications of proposed zoning changes that would affect non-conforming commercial uses or new residential development?

Business Beat

GNL thanks GBA
Ghent business owners provided food and beverages for the Ghent Neighborhood League’s “Candidates’ Night” in April and, again, hosted a Flag Day picnic for Ghent residents. The league is most appreciative of the association’s ongoing activities that benefit our community. Providing desserts, flags and balloons for the Ghent Neighborhood League’s discussion forum during for Norfolk City Council candidates were the Colley Cantina, Novelties Unlimited and Rajput Indian Cuisine and Virginia Espresso. The Flag Day picnic on June 17, attended by an estimated 300 people, was sponsored by the Ghent Business Association, G. W. Marketplace, Gateway Bank and others.

New Ghent Guide available
The Ghent Business Association recently updated its Ghent Guide for shopping, dining and entertainment. The brochure, available free of charge at Ghent businesses, features a map, a description of local attractions and the association’s vision statement.

First Fridays in Ghent off to a start
June 2 was the kick-off date for the Ghent Business Association’s event series “First Fridays in Ghent” which focuses on entertainment, dining and shopping late along Colley Avenue and 21st Street every first Friday of the month. Specialty stores stay open until 9 p.m., NET shuttle buses provide transportation and non-profit organizations staff open parking lots along Colley and 21st Street to raise funds and awareness for their groups. Performers are collecting tips.

Ghent market study due
The submission date for the final report by BBP Associates of its city-financed Ghent Economic & Market study was early July.

Changes:
– The Ghent Business Association has adopted a new security alert program for businesses between Olney Road and 22nd Street.
– Advantis real estate announced in May that Patricia and William Hoover sold The Painted Ladyrestaurant at 112 E. 17th St. to Dr. Gregory and Peggi MacMartin, who owned the Boomerangs restaurant in Portsmouth since 2004.
– The Red Dog Salon at 1421 Colley Ave. temporarily withdrew its application to the Norfolk Planning Commission for a special exception to operate an entertainment establishment but is expected to resubmit its application at a later day after having presented its plan to the Ghent Business Association and the Ghent Neighborhood League. Susanna Broegler of the Red Dog Saloon already had presented preliminary plans to the league at its April meeting.
– Claus Ihleman, owner of Decorum, plans to develop a new retail, office and commercial venue at 22nd and DeBree streets Street, to be called Palace Station.
– Anette Stein bought the Wild Monkey restaurant at Colley Ave. that recently reopened as The Green Onion under the management of Johnson & Wales graduate Sara Woodmansee.
– Taste of Chicago, trading as Plaza Del Sol at 2200 Colonial Ave. applied in June to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission in Richmond for a beer, wine and mixed beverages license.
– Kotobuki Enterprises Inc., trading as Kotobuki Japanese Restaurant at 721 W. 21st St. applied in March to the Alcoholic Beverage and Control Commission in Richmond for a wine, beer and mixed beverage license.
– Baker’s Crust Inc. trading as 330 W. 21st St., applied in March to the Alcoholic Beverage Commission for a mixed beverage license.
– Downing’s auto repair ship at the corner of Colonial Avenue and 22nd Street, a community fixture since 1939, was demolished June 19.

REAL ESTATE SALES
March 1, 2005, through June 30, 2006

The Ghent Neighborhood League thanks Wayne Goodman (692-6266) of Long & Foster Realtors’ Ghent Office for providing this information on recent Ghent property sales:
DETACHED List price Sale price
823 Maury $295,000 $295,000
916 Brandon $359,000 $359,000
931 Shirley $399,900 $375,000
1320 Stockley Gdns. $469,900 $469,900
611 Redgate $575,000 $567,500
612 Boissevain $625,000 $625,000
502 Colonial $659,000 $635,000
530 Mowbray $1,2000.000 $1,000,000
High: $1,00,000 Low: $295,000 Average: $540,800
ATTACHED List price Sale price

1409 Colonial, #A-2 $122,500 $122,500
1409 Colonial, #A-6 $122,500 $122,500
1409 Colonial, #A-4 $127,500 $127,500
1323 Colonial, #3 $159,900 $163,900
1323 Colonial, #2 $159,900 $155,000
1323 Colonial, #1 $159,900 $163,000
632 Raleigh, #6 $165,000 $165,000
1017 Colonial $174,900 $170,000
714 Redgate, #5 $175,000 $175,000
940 Gates, #4A $187,500 $187,500
610 W. Pr. Anne, #A4 $195,500 $197,500
830 Gates, #B3 $199,900 $185,000
816 Colley, #4 $209,900 $198,000
1300 Stockley, #202 $218,000 $210,000
1206 Stockley, #402 $219,000 $220,000
800 W. Pr. Anne, #D5 225,000 $235,000
610 W. Pr. Anne, #B2 $225,000 $225,000
534 Wash. Park, #A1 $229,900 $226,000
1206 Stockley, #404 $235,000 $235,000
1400 Hampton, #A1 $239,000 $235,000
628 Redgate, #C $249,000 $240,000
1915 Colonial, #4 $275,000 $254,000
802 Graydon, #A-3 $289,000 $282,500
1334 Stockley, #4 $349,900 $347,900
1334 Stockley, #1 $349,000 $349,900
1334 Stockley, #3 $349,900 $349,000
810 W. Pr. Anne, #204 $360,000 $350,000
810 W. Pr. Anne, #401 $395,000 $360,000
High: $360,000 Low: 122,500 Average: $211,617
APARTMENTS List Price Sales Price

1506 Colonial $1,800,000 $1,500,000

GHENT CRIME STATISTICS
Street block Offense
JUNE 2006

1000 Colley Larceny
900 Colonial Vandalism
900 Colonial Larceny
400 Fairfax Burglary, residence
400 Fairfax Larceny from auto
600 Graydon Burglary, residence
600 Graydon Burglary, residence
700 Graydon Hit and run
500 Mowbray Arch Other crime
400 Pembroke Hit and run
600 Raleigh Vandalism
600 Redgate Larceny from auto
600 Redgate Tempering with auto
800 Redgate Hit and run
800 Redgate Stolen vehicle
700 Westover Vandalism
800 Westover Identity theft
MAY 2006
Azalea Court Stolen vehicle
1400 Colley Larceny from auto
1600 Colley Embezzlement
1600 Colley Simple assault
1600 Colley Vandalism
1500 Colonial Vandalism
1600 Core Larceny
1900 Hampton Blvd. Vandalism
900 Harrington Burglary, residence
700 Spotswood Larceny parts from auto
900 Spotswood Hit and run
APRIL 2006
500 Boissevain Larceny parts from auto
500 Boissevain Larceny parts from auto
900 Colley Larceny from auto
900 Colley Larceny from auto
900 Colley Burglary, residence
800 Colonial Larceny from auto
800 Colonial Burglary, residence
1100 Colonial Larceny
600 Fairfax Stolen vehicle
500 Graydon Larceny from auto
1000 Hampton Blvd. Larceny
800 Manteo Larceny from auto
500 Pembroke Vandalism
600 Raleigh Vandalism
600 Raleigh Larceny of bicycle
600 Redgate Larceny from auto
For details, see the home page of http://www.norfolk.gov, “Neighborhood crime reporting program.”

Update, Correction to Newsletter

Since the July 2006 newsletter recently went out, here are a few thoughts and an immediate correction.
1.AVAILABILITY
For an electronic copy, please click on the “Newsletter Online!” button, right below News Flashes. Hard copies are available at their usual Ghent distribution sites (businesses of our advertisers, real estate offices, restaurants and the Van Wyck library). If you would like to receive the newsletter by mail, please contact us at gnl@GhentNeighborhoodLeague.org. The newsletter is mailed free of charge to all Ghent Neighborhood League members; non-members can receive the newsletter for an annual $10 fee.
2. CORRECTIONS
Based on incorrect information, the July 2006 Ghent Newsletter erroneously stated that the two Colonial Avenue properties on Colonial Avenue, owned by First Presbyterian Church, currently are on the city’s tax rolls. As representatives of the church told the Ghent Neighborhood League at its July 17 meeting, the church does not charge rents to its tenants at the two Colonial sites, i.e. the Norfolk Music Academy and the Tidewater Pastoral Counseling Services.
We much apologize for the error.
Generally speaking: We much invite all of our readers to let us know right away of any corrections that need to be made so that we can post them on our Web site immediately.
3. NEWSLETTER CONTRIBUTIONS
If you would like to contribute a story to the Ghent Newsletter, please contact us at our e-mail address.
4. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The Ghent Newsletter welcomes Letters to the Editor. Again, please contact us at our e-mail address.

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